Lancaster, Lou: Commercial Closeup Magic
©1984 Lou Lancaster; 2nd Printing 1985
Softcover; Comb bound, 8.5x11"; 124 pages
Tricks of the Trade
This is the inside page, not the
original cover page, as the original is a bit risque

Comments: This book by Lou Lancaster was not written to present a series of revolutionary magic, but to present many classic routines that are useful in everyday work and that have been presented by Mr. Lancaster hundreds of times. Many of the routines are suitable for restaurant or walk-around performance. The book features plenty of clear B&W photos throughout to explain all the critical moves. In addition, an appendix explains some basic sleights that are needed if they aren't explained in the routine description. The routines in this book are generally of a "moderate" nature; not too hard and not too easy.

Contents:

1 Magic for Openers:
3 It Vanishes Like a Shot: The magician approaches the table and asks if anyone ordered a shot glass of liquor. Upon receiving a "no" answer, the Shot glass disappears.
5 Did You Lose This? A straight-forward "in the spectator's hand" Sponge Ball routine utilizing a Purse Frame and featuring "splitting" a ball into two, the "10 count" (although not presented in a count of 10), and a vanish of the balls at the end.
11 The Lost and Found Department: This Color Changing Knives routine is also begun with the question of "did you lose this?". Utilized is a standard set of two knives. The knives pictured in the photos appear to be the "standard" Enardoe B&W knives. Routine ends with a vanish.

15 Coin Magic:
17 $1.01: A spectator is handed a silver dollar and penny and puts them behind her back Spectator hands the magician what she thinks is the penny, but the magician shows her he has the dollar. Spectator opens her hand to find it contains a dollar sized penny!
19 Money Runs Right Through Her Fingers: This is a Cap and Pence or Cylinder & Coin routine utilizing a rolled up dollar bill, a stack of quarters (non-swiveling preferred), five quarters, five pennies, and a small aspirin container (optional). Another straight-forward presentation.
23 Flashy Coins: A four coins through the table routine. Uses four regular coins (silver dollars or halves). The final coin vanishes in a "flash" of the paper it was wrapped in, and appears under the table with the other three coins that have already passed one by one.
27 The Coin Fold: Provides details of the coin fold (with flash paper) used in the previous routine, or could be used for other routines.

29 Money Magic:
31 The Bill Tear: A bill is borrowed, and the magician declares it to be phony as he rips the bill into small pieces. The magician then reaches into an empty purse frame and extracts a restored bill (serial numbers match, if desired); no TT used. 
35 The Floating Bill: a borrowed bill is crumpled up and rises into the air from the performer's hand. The bill is returned to the owner. Explains the complete hook-up.

37 Dice magic:
39 Dice Stacking: This is a short lesson on dice stacking, with detailed instructions on the basic moves. The routine ends with the revelation of a jumbo die under the cup. 

43 Gambling Magic:
45 The Three Shell Game: The description here is more of a "shell" (if you'll pardon the pun) of a "Walnut shells and pea" routine. Lou provides the basic premise, and suggests a source for a good rubber pea, but does not provide a full routine other than the basic moves.
47 The Three Card Monte: The cards are not gimmicked. Lou teaches the throw, and the routine ends with the "bent corner" climax. It is presented as a demonstration of the 3 Card Monte so that the spectator is not challenged.
51 Face Up Aces: In a gambling demonstration, the 4 Aces are spread face up through deck. When any number of hands are dealt (called out by the spectator), the face up Aces are dealt to the performer.

53 Card Magic:
55 The Boomerang Card: a playing card is tossed into the air, and returns to the deck, where it is found face up between two selections!
59 Card in the Wallet: This routine utilizes a Mullica Wallet. Even though the Mullica wallet is a "no palm" wallet, this routine utilizes a good bottom palm to enhance the presentation.
63 The Card to Pocket: A chosen card vanishes from the deck and is found in the magician's pocket. Utilizes the spectator peek and the side steal.
67 The Big Bullet: The two halves of the deck are mixed half-way, and the deck made to look like a gun. The Ace of Spades is given a flick with your finger, and a selected card "shoots" from the deck. 
69 Out of Sight, Out of Hand: a Card under glass routine
71 The Card in Mouth: a signed selection vanishes from the deck and appears folded up in the magician's mouth.

73 Appendix: sleights used in the above effects, plus some others
75 The Topit: The basic design of the Topit is explained
77 The Bottom Palm: described in detail
79 The Top Card Palm:  be bold!
81 The Biddle Move: used to secretly remove one or more cards as they are counted
83 The Classic Force: tips on one of the "best" forces
85 The Downs Change: exchange one card for another
87 The Double Lift: thumb get ready
89 The Multiple Shift: cards are placed in several places in a deck, yet are gathered to the bottom in a single cut
91 The Overhand Shuffle Control: controlling a selected card to the top of the deck
93 The Overhand Shuffle Stack: stacking the deck using the overhand shuffle
97 The Spectator Peek: a force
99 The Side Steal: secretly palm a card located anywhere in the deck
101 The False Cut: spectator begins the cut and the performer finishes it
103 The False Shuffle: false riffle shuffle
107 The Faro Shuffle: a brief explanation of the Faro
109 The Pressure Fan: a flourish

111 Presentation
113 Presentation: Don't be yourself; act! Work from your pockets; and other tips.
114 Recommended reading: Expert Card Technique, Modern Coin Magic, etc.
115 About the Author: a brief biography with several B&W photos, news clippings, and so forth
123 Phyllis Guggenheim: B&W photo and short biography


Previous